Indian Astrology

Jyotish is a sanskrit term which literally means Light. It is the study of the Sun, Moon, Stars and Planets and the effect they have on human life. A map of the heavens drawn up at the time of birth indicates the potential we have in areas of life such as career, relationships, health and finances. It is the aim of Jyotish to try and determine the ‘unseen’ influence of… Read Article →

Famous Astrologers in India

Bejan Daruwalla Bejan Daruwalla, born 11 July 1931, is a popular Indian astrology columnist. He has also served as a professor of English in Ahmedabad. Despite being of Parsi heritage, he is known to be an ardent follower of Shri Ganesh. His astrological techniques combines Indian and Western Astrology, I-Ching, Tarot reading, the Kabalah and Palmistry. Bejan Daruwalla launched his astrology website on 25 April 2003 at the Taj Mahal… Read Article →

How Indian Astrology Messes Up Newly Wedds’ Sexlife

Wherever we come from on this planet, whether we are religious or not, traditional or not, we all go through the same hormonal changes during puberty and then teenage years, discovering desire and all that jazz. The difference is that some wait and some don’t. In the Western world, except for a few Mormons and other true believers, not only couples already had sex before getting married, but some even… Read Article →

ETHNIC AND RELIGIOUS CONFLICTS IN INDIA

India is characterized by more ethnic and religious groups than most other countries of the world. Aside from the much noted 2000-odd castes, there are eight “major” religions, 15-odd languages spoken in various dialects in 22 states and nine union territories, and a substantial number of tribes and sects. Three ethnic or religious conflicts have stood out of late: two occurred in the states of “Assam and Punjab; another, the… Read Article →

Indian Novels That Explore Indian Mythology and Give a Fascinating Twist to Classics

Jaya by Devdutta Pattnaik Image Source This book is about Jaya and Ajaya, the twins who guard the entrance to Vaikuntha (Heaven). In his trademark style, Devdutta Pattnaik weaves various folk and regional variations of the Mahabharata to string together this retelling. The narrative is simple, and it sparks interest in the original text. Pattanaik has posed a lot of questions throughout the book about how we view stories and myths what makes us believe in them…. Read Article →

10 myths about India

Travelling is Dangerous Many would-be visitors avoid experiencing the wonders of India because it is “dangerous”.  If one believes the rumours; the medical conditions are horrendous, there are poisonous snakes everywhere, crime is rampant, and you are likely to be attacked by a tiger. With the exception of the tiger myth, the same things can be said with some degree of accuracy about America, Australia, and many parts of Europe,… Read Article →

The Return of the Ramayana

NEW DELHI — The news last month that Amish Tripathi was offered $1 million to write his next series of books astounded India’s English-language publishing industry. Advances of even $25,000 are rare here, and Tripathi still isn’t sure of the new work’s precise theme. That the deal was struck simply on the success of his 2010 trilogy about Shiva, the Hindu deity, is the starkest measure yet that Indian mythology has become the most… Read Article →

ORIGINS OF BUDHHISM

Buddhism, a religion that more than 300 million people currently practice, was founded in northeastern India by Prince Siddhartha in the sixth century B.C. Having achieved enlightenment, he became known as Shakyamuni and preached a path of salvation to his followers. Buddhism denies a supreme deity. Its earliest form was based on Shakyamuni’s teaching and moral code and stressed that everyone, through concerted individual effort and action, could achieve enlightenment…. Read Article →

Sikhism, A Colourful History

In Canada, Sikhs are the largest religious group among Indo-Canadians; the 2001 Canadian Census puts their number at 278,410 Sikhs in Canada. According to the 2004 Census, however, a more accurate number puts the number closer to 400,000. In the 1890s up until the early to mid 20th c., all immigrants coming from India were indiscriminately called and labelled under the general designation “Hindu” even if beyond 98% of South Asian… Read Article →